No Payments for 90 Days!

Capture

Kick back in our newly renovated service lounge and enjoy complimentary Wifi, gourmet coffee and snacks and even HD TV. Our complimentary shuttle service runs every half hour and allows you to schedule pickups within 20 miles from our store. Better yet, if your service lasts longer than 2 hours, we’ll give you a complimentary loaner car for the day!

Reno Tahoe Auto Group
3355 Kietzke Ln.
Reno, NV 89502
775-329-0303
Reno Tahoe Auto Group

 

Advertisements

Our Onsite Car Service and Maintenance Department

We also provide more than selling or leasing a vehicle to you. All car owners can take advantage of our onsite car service and maintenance department. Our team is highly-trained, and use the latest technology, tools, equipment and Ford, Chevrolet, Chrysler, GMC parts when we work on your vehicle, to give you a standout experience, and a long lasting ride that is properly cared for.

buick-gmc-service-part-specials-western-motor-in-garden-city.jpg

Reno Tahoe Auto Group
3355 Kietzke Ln.
Reno, NV 89502
775-329-0303
Reno Tahoe Auto Group

Our Quality Selection of Manufacturers

We provide you with many standout brands like Ford, Chevrolet, Chrysler, GMC models, while you can also find a quality selection of used cars, as well. No matter what, you’re going to find something that you want to drive off in. Along with that, we help you find a way to pay for your used ride with car loan and Ford, Chevrolet, Chrysler, GMC lease options, and work with you the entire time to find the best plan possible.

29243603_1003599886463486_2940976107951274998_n

Reno Tahoe Auto Group
3355 Kietzke Ln.
Reno, NV 89502
775-329-0303
Reno Tahoe Auto Group

Why Is It Hard to Shift My Automatic Transmission Out of Park?

Vehicles with an automatic transmission might not have a clutch and a stick shift, but they can still have trouble shifting. At times, drivers may have trouble getting the car out of Park and into gear. Problems with shifting your automatic transmission can come from a few different places, starting with the shift interlock feature. This is the part of an automatic transmission which requires you to step on the brake pedal to prevent unintentional shifting out of Park. If you are having trouble shifting the transmission, the interlock could be malfunctioning.

If the interlock switch is worn and not fully releasing, or the brakelights don’t receive a signal from the brakelight switch to illuminate (which makes the transmission think that the brakes aren’t engaged), you won’t be able to shift out of Park.

Alternatively, the shift cable or linkage connecting the shift lever to the transmission could be gummed up with grease or corroded so that it can’t operate freely. Grease, dirt and moisture can collect in or on the interlock and brakelight switches as well as on the shift cable and related parts, hampering their operation and making it hard to shift into gear. When that happens, you’re most likely to have problems shifting out of Park when the engine and transmission are cold, such as after the car has sat for hours. After the engine gets warm — and other parts throughout the vehicle get warmer, as well — the goo might become softer and make it easier to shift out of Park.

A transmission that’s low on transmission fluid also can be hard to shift out of Park, though that also would likely cause a noticeable degradation in the transmission’s overall performance, such as sluggish or harsh shifts. Changing the fluid is an infrequent maintenance item, but it still needs to be monitored.

Another possible cause is that when a vehicle is parked on even a slight incline, it will put more load on the transmission parking pawl (a bar that engages teeth in a transmission gear to prevent the vehicle from rolling). This is more likely to happen if you didn’t engage the parking brake before releasing the brake pedal. The weight of the vehicle rolling onto the parking pawl makes it harder to shift out of Park. To avoid this, engage the parking brake when on an incline before shifting into Park or releasing the brake pedal. That way the parking brake, not the transmission pawl, bears the load and will allow you to shift freely.

If the vehicle won’t shift out of park, don’t be too alarmed — there’s still a way to move it. Most cars have a means of overriding the shift lock to put the car in gear so you can drive to a mechanic for repairs rather than having it towed. A small door with a cover is often found on the console next to or close to the shifter itself. After prying this cover off, one can insert a screwdriver or key and press down to release the lock. Vehicles with column shifters (attached behind the steering wheel) may hide the release on top of the steering column or on the bottom. Your owner’s manual will help you identify the location of the shift lock in your vehicle.

Reno Tahoe Auto Group
3355 Kietzke Ln.
Reno, NV 89502
775-329-0303
Reno Tahoe Auto Group

How Often Should I Change Engine Coolant?

When is the right time to change your engine coolant? For some vehicles, you’re advised to change the coolant every 30,000 miles. For others, changing it isn’t even on the maintenance schedule.

For example, Hyundai says the coolant in the engine (what many refer to as “antifreeze”) in most of its models should be replaced after the first 60,000 miles, then every 30,000 miles after that. The interval is every 30,000 miles on some Mercedes-Benz models with some engines, but on others it’s 120,000 miles or 12 years. On still other Mercedes, it’s 150,000 miles or 15 years.

Some manufacturers recommend you drain and flush the engine’s cooling system and change the coolant more often on vehicles subjected to “severe service,” such as frequent towing, which can generate more heat. The schedule for many Chevrolets, though, is a change at 150,000 miles regardless of how the vehicle is driven.

Many service shops, though — including some at dealerships that sell cars with “lifetime” coolant  say you should do a coolant change more often than the maintenance schedule recommends, such as every 30,000 or 50,000 miles. 830201076-1436907842118.jpg

Here’s why: Most vehicles use long-life engine coolant (usually a 50/50 mixture of antifreeze and water) in the radiator that for several years will provide protection against boiling in hot weather and freezing in cold temperatures, with little or no maintenance. Modern vehicles also have longer intervals between fluid changes of all types partly because environmental regulators have pressured automakers to reduce the amount of old coolant, as well as other waste fluids, that must be disposed of or recycled.

Coolant can deteriorate over time and should be tested to see if it’s still good, as it can be hard to tell just by appearances. Even if the coolant reservoir shows sufficient coolant level and testing shows the cooling and antifreeze protection are still adequate, a coolant drain and antifreeze flush may be needed.

The coolant can become more acidic over time and lose its rust-inhibiting properties, causing corrosion. Corrosion can damage the radiator, water pump, thermostat, radiator cap, hoses and other parts of the cooling system, as well as to the vehicle heater system. And that can cause a car engine to overheat.

Thus, the coolant in any vehicle with more than about 50,000 miles should be tested periodically. That’s to look for signs of rust, leaks and to make sure it has sufficient cooling and overheating protection, even if the cooling system seems to be working properly and the reservoir is full. The cooling system can be checked with test strips that measure acidity, and with a hydrometer that measures freezing and boiling protection.

If the corrosion inhibitors have deteriorated, the antifreeze coolant should be changed. The cooling system might also need flushing to remove contaminants no matter what the maintenance schedule calls for or how many miles are on the odometer. On the other hand, if testing shows the coolant is still doing its job protecting from overheating and not allowing corrosion, changing it more often than what the manufacturer recommends could be a waste of money.

Reno Tahoe Auto Group
3355 Kietzke Ln.
Reno, NV 89502
775-329-0303
Reno Tahoe Auto Group

How Can I Tell If My Radiator Is Leaking?

img2069826377-1466619955458

When the temperature gauge on your dashboard reads high or a temperature warning light comes on, you have a cooling system problem that may be caused by a leak — be it in the radiator itself or some other component.

First, make sure it’s coolant that’s leaking, not another fluid. (Coolant is often referred to as antifreeze, but technically coolant is a 50/50 mix of antifreeze and water.) You can easily check the coolant level in your see-through overflow tank. If it’s empty or low, the next step should be to check the coolant level in the radiator, but that should be done only when the engine is cool.

Once you know you’re losing coolant, the radiator is a good place to start. Some radiator leaks will be easy to spot — such as a puddle underneath the radiator — but others not so much. It’s best to check the radiator from every angle, not just from above, and pay particular attention to seams and the bottom. Corrosion inside the radiator or holes from road debris also can cause leaks.

Antifreeze comes in different colors — green, yellow and pinkish-red, for example — feels like slimy water and usually has a sweet smell. If you can’t see coolant dripping or seeping, look for rust, tracks or stains on the radiator. Those are telltale signs of where it has leaked.

If the radiator appears to be OK, the cooling system offers several possibilities for leaks, including the hoses from the radiator to the engine, the radiator cap, water pump, engine block, thermostat, overflow tank, heat exchanger (a small radiator that circulates hot coolant into the dashboard for cabin heating) and others. A blown gasket between the cylinder head and engine block is another possibility, allowing coolant inside the combustion chambers — a problem that must be addressed immediately by a mechanic.

If you can’t find a leak, have it checked by a professional. Coolant has a way of escaping only under pressure when the car is running — possibly in the form of steam, which may not leave a trace.

Reno Tahoe Auto Group
3355 Kietzke Ln.
Reno, NV 89502
775-329-0303
Reno Tahoe Auto Group