Our Facilities

Our facility and staff are well-equipped to handle any of your used car maintenance needs. Pre-owned vehicles are our bread and butter, and that shows through in the maintenance services we provide. From Mazda to Mercedes-Benz, the technicians at Reno Tahoe Auto Group have experience dealing with an amalgam of makes, models, and body types. Don’t sweat; bring in your ride and our mechanics will know what to do. Does your Ford F-150 need an oil change? Does your Subaru Outback need transmission service? We’re ready for both and more.

Reno Tahoe Auto Group
3355 Kietzke Ln.
Reno, NV 89502
775-329-0303 
Reno Tahoe Auto Group

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Our Dealership

We provide you with many standout Ford, Chevrolet, Chrysler, GMC models, while you can also find a quality selection of used cars, as well. No matter what, you’re going to find something that you want to drive off in. Along with that, we help you find a way to pay for your used ride with car loan and Ford, Chevrolet, Chrysler, GMC lease options, and work with you the entire time to find the best plan possible.

Reno Tahoe Auto Group
3355 Kietzke Ln.
Reno, NV 89502
775-329-0303
Reno Tahoe Auto Group

Quality Auto Service and Repair

Our skilled and detail-oriented team loves serving your automotive needs. That means when you visit our Reno, Nevada showroom, you can count on a positive auto service experience, which includes only genuine Ford, Chevrolet, Chrysler and GMC parts. Whether you’re interested in a simple oil change or tire rotation or you’ve come across a problem that needs to be repaired, our team will work to get you back on the road with a focus on safety, quality and efficiency – because we know nothing is more important to you.

If you’re interested in seeing what we can do for your Ford F-150, Ford Focus, Chevrolet Silverado, Chrysler 200 or GMC Sierra 1500, be sure to fill out our online appointment form today. We’ll quickly confirm your appointment’s details, such as time, date and the specific work that needs to be completed. With Reno Tahoe Auto Group by your side, you can count on a worry-free driving experience.

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Reno Tahoe Auto Group
3355 Kietzke Ln.
Reno, NV 89502
775-329-0303
Reno Tahoe Auto Group

How To Check Your Tire Pressure

1. Buy a tire pressure gauge. Don’t rely on the gauges attached to gas station air pumps. “Gas station inflation systems take a good deal of abuse, which can affect the accuracy,” says Zielinski.

Small, portable gauges are sold at auto parts stores and many general-merchandise retailers. They and cost anywhere from $5 to $50, but a good one can be had for under $15, according to Consumer Reports.

2. Let your tires cool down. Wait until your vehicle has been sitting still for at least three hours. Your tires have to be “cold” in order for you to get an accurate reading. If a tire has been recently driven, the air inside will have warmed up and expanded, temporarily increasing the pressure.

3. Get the numbers. Look for your vehicle’s recommended tire pressure in the owner’s manual. You can also find it on the driver-side door, glove compartment or trunk lid. The number will be next to “psi.” (It will also be listed metrically as “kPa, or kilopascals, for drivers who use the metric system.)

Don’t use the “psi” number listed on the tire’s sidewall. That’s the maximum — not the recommended — pressure, according to Zielinski. You want to avoid overinflating your tires. “Overinflated tires have a smaller contact patch with the road, which affects handling,” he says. “They also will wear out the center of the tread faster and will be more susceptible to road hazard damage.”

4. Check the pressure. On each tire, including the spare, unscrew the valve cap from the stem, located on the side of the tire. Fit the tire gauge into the stem. If you hear a hissing sound, which is air escaping, adjust the fit until it stops. Then read the pressure number on the gauge.

5. Adjust the pressure. If the number on the gauge is lower than recommended, drive to a nearby service station and add enough air to bring it up to the recommended number — but no higher. Don’t try to compensate for warm tires by overinflating, which creates a safety hazard. Instead, perform a second check later, after the tires are cold again. Then return to add more air if needed.

If the number on the gauge is too high, just press the valve stem gently — you can use the side of the gauge for this — to let some air out.

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Reno Tahoe Auto Group
3355 Kietzke Ln.
Reno, NV 89502
775-329-0303
Reno Tahoe Auto Group

How To Winterize Your Car

Is your car ready for winter? If you have a warm blanket in the trunk and good tires on your car (snow tires if you live somewhere that merits them), you’re off to a good start. But follow these other smart safety precautions and you’ll really be firing on all cylinders.

Quick winter car safety tips

  • Check your tire pressure. Air pressure drops in cold weather, and improperly inflated tires can cause poor handling, irregular wear on the tires and lower gas mileage, says Dawn Leyden of Firestone Complete Auto Care in Oak Lawn, Illinois. Don’t forget to check the pressure in your spare, too.
  • Keep the right stuff in the trunk. That means a blanket, but also a hat and gloves. You’ll also want a bag of salt, sand or non-clumping kitty litter for traction in case one of your tires gets stuck in the snow, plus extra windshield fluid and of course, an ice scraper and shovel. If you have to lie on the ground to change a tire, you’ll be glad you stashed a tarp or garbage bag in there. Throw in a brightly colored cloth to tie to your antenna in case you get stuck. Also keep a few snacks, like granola bars and unsalted canned nuts, on hand, as well as bottled water. The bottles should be only two-thirds full to keep them from bursting if they freeze, Leyden notes. No matter what the season, it’s always smart to carry a flashlight and batteries, flares, a first-aid kit and jumper cables.
  • Gas up. Tend to hit E before a fill-up? That’s a riskier move in the winter, when storms could mean getting stuck in long traffic jams. Play it safe: When the tank’s half full, stop and refuel. If you do get stranded, you’ll be thankful for the extra gas because it means you can keep the engine running —and have heat.
  • Park nose to nose. You never know when your car battery might die. If it does, getting a jump-start will be easier if you’re parked hood to hood with another car, says Leyden. Alternatively, pull up to the side of a building. “That way, cold air and snow aren’t going through the front portion of the vehicle and getting inside the radiator and condenser.”
  • Make time for a warm-up. In freezing temps, your engine needs to warm up before it can function properly, says Leyden. Before you drive, she recommends running the engine for 5 to 10 minutes if it’s in the teens or 10 to 15 minutes if it’s below zero. Plan ahead so you won’t end up in a rush on the road.
  • Raise your wipers before a storm. This way, they won’t freeze to the windshield.

Pre-season to-do’s

  • Get your car serviced for winter. Have a service center confirm that all your car’s systems are ready to withstand low temps and poor driving conditions. Have all fluid levels checked, including brake and power steering fluid, oil, antifreeze and windshield defroster. The technician should also give your battery, brakes, belts and tubes, radiator, exhaust and ignition system a thumbs-up. A reputable service center should be happy to perform a courtesy check of these systems, says Leyden.
  • Switch windshield wiper fluid. According to the National Safety Council, you should switch to a windshield wiper fluid that also contains a de-icer to keep the spray from freezing.
  • Replace worn wiper blades. After all, when it comes to driving in a storm, being able to see is key.

winterize

Reno Tahoe Auto Group
3355 Kietzke Ln.
Reno, NV 89502
775-329-0303
Reno Tahoe Auto Group